2016 Year in Reading

by James Wallace Harris, Saturday, December 31, 2016

December 31st is my time to contemplate my year in reading. I pick my favorite novels and nonfiction books, and I pick my book of the year. Unfortunately, I’m disturbed to discover that I don’t have any favorite novels for this year. Usually, I read several works of fiction that profoundly move me. This year none did. I need to concentrate on finding great novels in 2017.

I read several good novels, but none that had a deep impact. That’s partly due to so much rereading. Stand on Zanzibar and Hyperion are fantastic books, but this was my third reading for both, and I’m not inclined to list them as books that wowed me this year. I will say I was most impressed with the stories I read by Philip Wylie, Barbara Pym, Charlie Jane Anders, Walker Percy, and Keith Roberts, which were all new reads. I enjoyed them, admired them, but I’m not sure I’d recommend them to a general audience. Each will appeal to a selective group.

I read 55 books this year, about average for me. I read 15 books published during the year, which fulfills the goal I made in 2015 to read more new books. I failed at reading fewer novels. I meant to read only 12 but read 23.

Nonfiction was another matter in 2016. I’m going to have a very hard time picking my top five nonfiction books. Here are the books I wholeheartedly recommend as solidly good books that should appeal to most readers of their topics:

  • Science Wars (Great Course lecture) by Steven L. Goldman (the philosophical evolution of science)
  • The Search for Philip K. Dick by Anne R. Dick (PKD during his best writing years)
  • The Hare with the Amber Eyes by Edmund de Waal (art and memory, excellent example of memoir)
  • I Am Alive And You Are Dead by Emmanuel Carrere (the best bio on Philip K. Dick)
  • How Great Science Fiction Works (Great Course lecture) by Gary K. Wolfe (history of science fiction)
  • Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (black lives matter)
  • Dark Money by Jane Meyer (corruption in America)
  • Jesus Before the Gospels by Bart D. Ehrman (memory)
  • Furiously Happy by Jenny Lawson (hilarious humor and mental illness)
  • Saving Capitalism by Robert B. Reich (title says it all)
  • When Everything Changed by Gail Collins (why women’s rights had greater impact than computers 1961-2007)
  • Sex Object by Jessica Valenti (personal view of being a sex object)
  • H is for Hawk by Helen Macdonald (raising a bird of prey, excellent memoir)
  • Girls & Sex by Peggy Orenstein (statistical reporting on being a sex object)
  • Leonard by William Shatner (loving memory of Mr. Spock)
  • A Brief History of Misogyny by Jack Holland (exactly what the title says)
  • The Big Picture by Sean Carroll (sweeping overview of cosmology, physics, and philosophy)
  • Time Travel: A History by James Gleick (all the ramifications of time and time travel)
  • Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are? by Frans de Waal (the nature of consciousness)
  • The Bible Unearth by Israel Finkelstein and Neil Asher Silberman (comparing archeology to Bible history)
  • The Undoing Project by Michael Lewis (all about Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky)
  • Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance (poor and white in America, fantastic example of memoir)
  • The Soul of a New Machine by Tracy Kidder (pushing people to their creative limit, state of the art creative nonfiction)
  • Who Wrote the Bible? by Richard Eliott Friedman (textual analysis, history, religion, and authorship)

Top 5 Nonfiction Books of 2016

  • Who Wrote the Bible? by Richard Eliott Friedman (1987)
  • Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are? by Frans de Waal (2016)
  • Hillbilly Elegy by J. D. Vance (2016)
  • Dark Money by Jane Meyer (2016)
  • Jesus Before the Gospels by Bart D. Ehrman (2016)

It was extremely hard to limit my favorites down to five. Most of the nonfiction I read this year were exceptional reads. Quite often, as I read these books, I assumed I had my book of the year.

Because I didn’t have a novel of the year, that makes the book of the year obvious:

Book of the Year

Who Wrote the Bible

This is pretty amazing considering I’m an atheist. You might think I’m secretly religious since I also picked Jesus Before the Gospels as another top five book. Ehrman’s book is really about memory, and I’m obsessed with the topic of memory. I’ve tried to read The Bible several times in my life, but always bog down in the boring books of the middle. All the best Bible stories are in The Book of Genesis, The Book of Exodus, the four Gospels, and The Book of Revelation. What Friedman does is explain the documentary hypothesis, its history, and evolution, and then refines it with his latest research and analysis. This made the boring books of The Bible fascinating. Reading Who Wrote the Bible? along with The Bible Unearthed made me see The Bible as history and not religion. Such knowledge only purifies my atheism by showing that The Bible is not what I was told it was as a child. The Bible a wonderful book about learning how humans thought 2,500-3,000 years ago. Figuring out that the Hebrew bible probably had four authors (J, E, D, P) and one editor (the redactor), and why they wrote what they wrote, let me see why it was written. It was really about politics and creating a nation, and not spirituality. (By the way, I know it is still debatable if some of those authors were not teams of writers and editors.)

On one hand, I wished humanity would just forget religion. On the other hand, all the clues to how we thought thousands of years ago are embedded in ancient religious texts from around the world. Studying these works show we haven’t changed, and it’s not likely we will. Our culture has evolved significantly, acquiring knowledge and technology, but the various ranges of human actions, thinking and emotions have not. Knowing this goes a long way to understanding my second favorite book of the year, Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are? by Frans de Waal. Both of these books decode the political events of 2016. We really don’t change. For example, the modern conflict between Sunni and Shiites was reflected in the power struggles described by the Deuteronomists, with the descendants of Moses and Aaron, or why J and E wanted their stories in The Book of Genesis. I picked Who Wrote The Bible? as my book-of-the-year because it added to most new details to my map of reality.

Books Read 2016 (Links are to essays I wrote about these books)

Steven L. Goldman Science Wars 2016-01-07 Audible 2006
Elizabeth Gilbert Big Magic 2016-01-07 Library hardback 2015
Anne R. Dick The Search for Philip K. Dick 2016-01-19 Trade paper 2009
Edmund de Waal The Hare with the Amber Eyes 2016-01-24 Library hardback 2010
Emmanuel Carrere I Am Alive And You Are Dead 2016-01-26 Trade paper 2004
John Brunner Stand On Zanzibar 2016-01-29 Audible 1968
Graeme Simsion The Rosie Project 2016-02-03 Kindle ebook 2013
Charlie Jane Anders All the Birds in the Sky 2016-02-14 Audible 2016
Kurt Vonnegut Bluebeard 2016-02-18 Library hardback 1987
Gary T. Wolfe How Great Science Fiction Works 2016-02-24 Audible 2016
Ta-Nehisi Coates Between the World and Me 2016-02-24 Library hardback 2015
Dan Simmons Hyperion 2016-02-28 Audible 1989
Jessica Chiarella And Again 2016-03-06 Audible 2016
Jane Mayer Dark Money 2016-03-15 Library hardback 2016
John Seabrook The Song Machine 2016-03-18 Audible 2015
Bart D. Ehrman Jesus Before the Gospels 2016-03-26 Library hardback 2016
Justine Ezarik I, Justine 2016-03-30 Audible 2015
Keith Roberts Pavane 2016-04-03 Audible 1968
Lady Dorothy Mills Phoenix 2016-04-10 Hardback 1926
Jenny Lawson Furiously Happy 2016-04-16 Library hardback 2015
Deborah Davis Strapless 2016-05-18 Library hardback 2003
Paul Kalanithi When Breath Becomes Air 2016-05-21 Library hardback 2016
Dan Simmons The Fall of Hyperion 2016-05-24 Audible 1990
Clifford Simak A Heritage of Stars 2016-06-01 Audible 1977
Robert B. Reich Saving Capitalism 2016-06-04 Audible 2015
Philip Wylie The Disappearance 2016-06-11 Audible 1951
B. A. Shapiro The Art Forger 2016-06-16 Kindle ebook 2012
Gail Collins When Everything Changed 2016-06-20 Audible 2009
Jessica Valenti Sex Object 2016-06-24 Library hardback 2016
Rainbow Rowell Eleanor & Park 2016-06-28 Audible 2012
William Golding Lord of the Flies 2016-07-03 Audible 1954
Peggy Orenstein Girls & Sex 2016-07-07 Library hardback 2016
Helen Macdonald H is for Hawk 2016-07-20 Audible 2015
William Shatner Leonard 2016-08-06 Library hardback 2016
Ta-Nehisi Coates Between the World and Me 2016-08-17 Audible 2015
Neil Clarke ed. The Best Science Fiction of the Years – Volume 1 2016-09-14 Audible 2016
Barbara Pym Excellent Women 2016-09-22 Audible 1952
Jack London The Scarlet Plague 2016-09-28 Audible 1912
Jack Holland A Brief History of Misogyny 2016-10-11 Audible 2006
Arthur C. Clarke 2001: A Spacy Odyssey 2016-10-14 Audible 1968
Sean Carroll The Big Picture 2016-10-27 Audible 2016
Zenna Henderson Pilgrimage: The Book of the People 2016-11-01 Library hardback 1961
James Gleick Time Travel: A History 2016-11-17 Library ebook 2016
Frans de Waal Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are? 2016-11-19 Audible 2016
Edward O. Wilson Half-Earth 2016-11-21 Audible 2016
Walker Percy Love in the Ruins 2016-11-30 Audible 1971
J. G. Ballard The Drowned World 2016-12-04 Audible 1962
Andre Norton The Stars Are Ours! 2016-12-07 Web audio 1954
Andre Norton Star Born 2016-12-12 Web audio 1957
Israel Finkelstein, Neil Asher Silberman The Bible Unearthed 2016-12-19 Hardback 2001
Michael Lewis The Undoing Project 2016-12-19 Audible 2016
Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol 2016-12-24 Audible 1843
J. D. Vance Hillbilly Elegy 2016-12-25 Library hardback 2016
Tracy Kidder The Soul of a New Machine 2016-12-28 Hardback 1981
Richard Elliot Friedman Who Wrote the Bible? 2016-12-29 Hardback 1987

My goal for 2017 is to try and read more nonfiction, especially new books. I’m not going to worry about how many works of fiction I read, but I do want to work harder at finding the best fiction possible. I also want to stop reading mediocre books.

JWH

10 thoughts on “2016 Year in Reading”

  1. This is a dreadfully hard time of year for me, Jim! All my friends are writing out the “best of” lists for the year and I add so many to my wish lists at Amazon and Audible (which I use!) – I’ve read about 7 of your “best of” books and agree they’re great (and I’ve got another one coming up). Meanwhile, I’m adding a few to ye olde wish lists:
    Furiously Happy by Jenny Lawson
    Saving Capitalism by Robert B. Reich
    The Bible Unearthed by Israel Finkelstein and Neil Asher Silberman
    Who Wrote the Bible? by Richard Eliott Friedman

  2. Hi James

    Happy New Year you evil man, one of my themes for 2017 was spending less compulsively on books and reading all the books we already have. The Gleick was already on my TBR list as was the Oxford Bible you mentioned earlier but now thanks to you, I am adding the Wolfe, the Friedman, the two books on Dick and the Carroll and I will probably add more on rereading your post. I did read The Hare With the Amber Eyes which I quite enjoyed.

    I may try the library first although nothing beats the sight of your own books until you have to find more room or the MasterCard comes.

    Happy Reading
    Guy

  3. Hoping that responding to comments by replying to the email message containing your post works. Have you ever read anything by Richard Russo? Nobody’s fool on Audible read by Ron McClarty rates as one of my favourite books read during 2016The as does Houe on Beartown Road by Elizabeth Cohen (Cohn?)

  4. I enjoyed your list. If you GOOGLE “The Economist Best Books of 2016” you’ll find a fabulous list of books. Every year I find The Economist’s list to reveal amazing books that fly under the Reviewing Radar.

  5. I think THE ECONOMIST is the best magazine in the world. And I consider the WALL STREET JOURNAL–despite its flaws–the best newspaper in the world. Both publications present YEAR’S BEST BOOKS lists every year, but I’ve found THE ECONOMIST is more adventurous in their choices.

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