Picking 52 Books to Read in 2015

By James Wallace Harris, Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Last year I read 67 books. At first thought, I wondered if I could read 100 books in 2015.  But I neither want to spend all my time reading, nor do I want to be in a race to finish 100 books. Reading one book a week is a nice pace for me, however for many years now, I’ve been buying about five books a week. This certainly presents a problem if I don’t want to speed up my reading pace.

To complicate the situation, I’ve been buying some rather outstanding books that I’m lusting to read soon. I’ve gathered books for decades in anticipation of retiring. I thought for sure retiring would let me read 100-200 books a year, but after my first year of not working I’ve discovered I’m not inclined to be a superbookworm. I now have more books than I could read in five retired lives. Once on my bookshelf, books are out-of-sight out-of-mind, leaving me literary hungry to prowl the bookstores. I need to fix that.

Since I’m always compelled to start projects I never finished, I thought this week’s ambitious endeavor would be to go through my physical bookshelves, my library at Audible.com and my Kindle library at Amazon.com and pick the 52 books I’d most loved to read most. To nag myself daily of this project, I thought I’d pile them up somewhere very visible so they will sneer at me to be read. But since so many are digital, invisible from view, I figured I needed to slightly amend that inspiration. Thus the muse for this blog post. I’ll make a list that I will meditate on daily, and keep it near the pile of physical books that are begging me to be read.

Here are the 52 books I’d love to read in 2015. I’d be immensely satisfied with myself if I did, and very proud if I read half their number. They will be in no order – just listed as I pull them from the shelves and stack them in their special pile. This is a nice snapshot of my interests at the beginning of 2015. It will be revealing to see how I do at the beginning of 2016. I’m pretty sure I’ll have read 52 books, but will it be these books?

I know myself well enough to know I won’t stick to the plan exactly, but I’m curious how close I can get at predicting my reading future. I know I will read a bunch of science fiction books I haven’t listed, and books for my book clubs that haven’t been selected yet. I will promote these books when we nominate books though, so I can get some extra incentive to read them. In fact, some of the books listed here are books I was supposed to read in 2014 for book clubs, but didn’t. And some of these books are ones I’ve started and never completed.

What’s interesting, is 52 books is probably more books than I read to get my Bachelor’s degree. And this list covers a lot of subjects. If I do read and comprehend them, it will be like getting another degree.

  1. This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate by Naomi Klein
  2. The Most Dangerous Book: The Battle for James Joyce Ulysses by Kevin Birmingham
  3. The Age of Atheists: How We Have Sought to Live Since the Death of God by Peter Watson
  4. Ulysses by James Joyce
  5. The Man Who Knew Too Much: Alan Turing and the Invention of the Computer by David Leavitt
  6. Grace Hopper and the Invention of the Information Age by Kurt W. Beyer
  7. ENIAC: The Triumphs and Tragedies of The World’s First Computer by Scott McCartney
  8. Old Friends by Tracy Kidder
  9. What Makes This Book so Great by Jo Walton
  10. Consciousness Explained by Daniel C. Dennett
  11. Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge by Edward O. Wilson
  12. Alone Together: Why We Expect More From Technology and Less From Each Other by Sherry Turkle
  13. On Writing Well by William Zinsser
  14. Lord of the Flies by William Golding
  15. The History of Mr. Wells by Michael Foot
  16. About Town: The New Yorker and the World it Made by Ben Yagoda
  17. Age of Ambition: Chasing Fortune, Truth and Faith in the New China by Evan Osnos
  18. Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies by Nick Bostrom
  19. It’s Complicated by Danah Boyd
  20. The Origins of Political Order: From Prehuman Times to the French Revolution by Francis Fukuyama
  21. This Will Make You Smarter: New Scientific Concepts to Improve Your Thinking by John Brockman
  22. Under the Volcano by Malcolm Lowry
  23. Darwin’s Dangerous Idea: Evolution and the Meaning of Life by Daniel C. Dennett
  24. The End of Growth: Adapting to Our New Economic Reality by Richard Heinberg
  25. Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahnerman
  26. Civilization: The West and the Rest by Niall Ferguson
  27. The Social Conquest of Earth by Edward O. Wilson
  28. Can You Forgive Her? by Anthony Trollope
  29. The Age of Wonder: How the Romantic Generation Discovered the Beauty and Terror of Science by Richard Holmes
  30. Turing’s Cathedral: The Origins of the Digital Universe by George Dyson
  31. The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined by Steven Pinker
  32. Fooled by Randomness: The Hidden Role of Chance in Life and in the Markets by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
  33. Before the Dawn: Recovering the Lost History of Our Ancestors by Nicholas Wade
  34. The Dream of Reason: A History of Philosophy from the Greeks to the Renaissance by Anthony Gottlieb
  35. The Origin of Species by Charles Darwin
  36. Atonement by Ian McEwan
  37. The Math Book by Clifford Pickover
  38. Mathematics: The Loss of Certainty by Morris Kline
  39. A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunity by Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn
  40. Emergence: The Connected Lives of Ants, Brains, Cities, and Software by Steven Johnson
  41. Darwin Among the Machines: The Evolution of Global Intelligence by George B. Dyson
  42. The Roads to Modernity: The British, French, and American Enlightenments by Gertrude Himmelfarb
  43. The Meaning of Human Existence by Edward O. Wilson
  44. A City So Grand: The Rise of an American Metropolis, Boston 1850-1900 by Stephen Puleo
  45. The Closing of the Western Mind: The Rise of Faith and the Fall of Reason by Charles Freeman
  46. The Violinist’s Thumb by Sam Kean
  47. Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
  48. How To Live or A Life of Montaigne by Sarah Bakewell
  49. Glut: Mastering Information Through the Ages by Alex Wright
  50. The Stone Diaries by Carol Shields
  51. We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves
  52. Children of God by Mary Doria Russell

JWH

6 thoughts on “Picking 52 Books to Read in 2015”

  1. Good luck! I do challenges a bit – but I don’t take them real seriously. Rather I tend to read what I want and see if the book fits. Also, if I do have time in my scheduled reading and I’m stumped as to what to read next I might look and see if any of my challenges needs tending to
    https://beckylindroos.wordpress.com/upcoming/yearly-challenges/
    https://beckylindroos.wordpress.com/upcoming/
    I don’t have any nonfiction challenges going, but I don’t really feel any kind of need. I really don’t want to regulate my reading too much, I like some freedom.

  2. Good luck on your goal. I’ve read 13 out of the 52 on your list. I would recommend “Age of Atheist” for the book to read just before bed. It doesn’t need to be read continuously since it doesn’t necessarily read like a book but more like an encyclepedia (I liked it very much).

    1. That’s what I’ve done. I’ve started dipping into The Age of Atheists and I’m very impressed. It is a problem though, because it makes me want to go off and search for all the books he mentions.

  3. Hey James, why not add some free online courses to your list of 2015 activities? Coursera has some really great offerings.

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